Category Archives: book

What customers want

“I have an idea.” The 4 words that strike fear into my wife How do you know if your killer new idea is really any good? Although my recent book, The Innovation Revelation, looked at finding solutions to customers’ problems at a macro level (i.e. from understanding the intersection between an organisation’s needs and customer… Read More »

I spy a dysfunction in the house

Charlie is at his wits end. He and his team suffer from their organisation’s bad practices on a daily basis and he has had enough. He writes his resignation letter, listing a dozen problems. Some of you will recognise this as the start to my new book, a story about a fictional organisation called Nuttinghams.… Read More »

Calming the noise

With our addictive apps, sticky widgets, and blindly engaging interactions, we’ve created an era of distraction and fear. How familiar is the following scenario? You’re focusing on writing an email when your watch vibrates to alert you to a new email. Buzz. You give it a quick glance, decide to deal with it later and… Read More »

Nudge

Nudge is a book that investigates the philosophical questions around influencing people. Although it was first published in 2008, it is still as relevant today. And it’s made an impact on how organisations think. Organisations such as governments. I’ll paraphrase their example to explain. Let’s pretend that you run your local secondary school’s self-service canteen.… Read More »

The Goal becomes graphic

What’s your favourite business-focused book? Someone asked me this the other day. Although I considered Dan Pink’s Drive, Cialdini’s Influence, Duckworth’s Grit, Hubbard’s How to Measure Anything and a raft of others, it had to be Goldratt’s The Goal. Now it’s in graphic form!   The book, first published in 1984, was not just the best explanation of the… Read More »

Ask-learn-evaluate cycle

What’s the best way to go about building a new product, service or solution? Many will say that it is Lean Startup’s build-measure-learn cycle. I don’t disagree that it makes sense testing assumptions and getting early feedback, but I believe that there’s a process that precedes it. I’d argue that build-measure-learn is the second step… Read More »