IIBB rules

We have devised 4 different games to play with Iterative Incremental Big Bang. However, these are only suggestions, so please feel free to play with the cards in a way that will best benefit you, your teams, organisations and clients. You can see how others have used the cards here.

Adobe_PDF_file_icon_32x32 Click for PDF version of the rules

 


Game 1 “Poker-style” (max ~ 10 players)

This is an entry-level game and should be run after an explanation of the concepts of iterative, incremental and big bang. Ideally, this will be run by an experienced facilitator.

  1. Each player is given a set of 3 approach (white) cards
  2. One player acts as the dealer and reads out a scenario (black) card
  3. Each player (not dealer) chooses their preferred approach to tackle the scenario and places the corresponding approach card face down on the table in front of them
  4. Once everyone has chosen a card, they are all declared
  5. Each player then has 1 minute to explain why they chose the approach they did (dealer may choose who goes first)
  6. Group discusses validity of each approach
  7. After 5-10 minutes, another scenario card is drawn and the process starts again

Game 2 “Lose the cards” (max ~ 10 players)

This is similar to game 1, but the aim is to players to lose all of their cards. It may require a bit more ability from participants, but is a good session for teams.

  1. Same person plays the Dealer for the whole game
  2. Each player is given a set of 3 approach (white) cards
  3. Dealer reads out a scenario (black) card
  4. Each player (except the Dealer) chooses their preferred approach to tackle the scenario and places the corresponding approach card face down on the table in front of them*
  5. Once everyone has chosen a card, they are all declared
  6. Each player takes in turn to explain why they chose the approach they did (max 30 seconds each)
  7. Dealer chooses a winning approach based on which arguments that were most convincing
  8. All players who chose the winning approach get to discard their card into the centre of the table
  9. Repeat from step 3
  10. The winner is the first player to get rid of all their approach cards

* The twist in this game is that, as players are only allowed to declare an approach on a card they are still holding, they may be forced to formulate an argument for an approach they don’t necessarily agree is best for the scenario being discussed.


Game 3 “Dealer’s debate” (max 53 players)

This game takes formulating arguments one step further. It would be really useful for team bonding and for discussion groups, where there is a mixture of experience in the group.

  1. Setup: count out enough approach (white) cards for players to have one card each, ensuring there is an even split of each type of approach card
  2. One player takes the role of dealer
  3. Dealer shuffles the approach cards and deals a single approach card, face down, to each player (not dealer)
  4. Dealer takes a scenario (black) card and reads it out to the group
  5. Players with matching approach cards group together and have 15 minutes to formulate an argument for their approach.
  6. Each of the three groups then has 1 minute to present why their approach is best (Dealer can choose order of speakers if necessary)
  7. Dealer then chooses which team was most convincing and declares a winner for the round
  8. All approach cards are then returned to the dealer
  9. Dealer passes approach cards to the person on their right – who then takes the role of dealer for the next round
  10. Repeat from step 3

Game 4 “Vote debate” (max 52 players)

A twist of game 3 which removes the role of dealer. It requires the team to self-organise and agree on a winner.

  1. Setup: count out enough approach (white) cards for players to have one card each, ensuring there is an even split of each type of approach card
  2. One player takes the role of dealer
  3. Dealer shuffles the approach cards and deals a single approach card, face down, to each player (including dealer)
  4. Dealer takes a scenario (black) card and places it face up on the table
  5. Players (including dealer) with matching approach cards group together and have 15 minutes to formulate an argument for their approach
  6. Each of the three groups then has 1 minute to present why their approach is best
  7. Players then vote on which argument was best and declare a winner for the round
  8. All approach cards are then returned to the dealer
  9. Dealer passes approach cards to the person on their right – who then takes the role of dealer for the next round
  10. Repeat from step 3

 

 

 

Adobe_PDF_file_icon_32x32 Click for PDF version of the rules