Category Archives: terminology

Student’s t-statistic

Introduction In 1908, a guy at Guinness found a way to measure which types of barley produced the best beer-brewing yields: he called it the “t-statistic”. However, because Guinness was paranoid about giving away trade secrets, he had to publish his ideas under the pseudonym “Student”. Although we now know his name was William Sealy… Read More »

A new game

Although we don’t favour revolutionary changes, most of us first experience agile through a radical and wholesale transformation to Scrum. Along with all the changes to roles, meetings and working approach, we find ourselves bombarded with new terminology. Two terms that seem to confuse many newbies (and not-so-newbies) are incremental and iterative. I discuss the… Read More »

Scaled Scrum is just Scrum

I’ve always been a believer that, rather than focusing on scaling agile, you should just focus on being Agile. However, over the last few years, a number of frameworks have emerged with the aim of ‘scaling’ Agile. SAFe and LeSS are two such examples of scaling frameworks. Scrum.org has now also thrown its hat into the… Read More »

We’ve been doing it all wrong!

I can hear myself saying it now: “If you count up the number of work items in each column, and keep a record of each item’s start and end date, then you can create a CFD [Cumulative Flow Diagram], control chart and histogram”. Apparently I was wrong. Apparently nearly all of us are doing it… Read More »

Is pairing just for developers?

Last weekend I was chatting with my Dad about his current work project, and our conversation led me to start thinking about pair programming and pairing in general. The idea of pair programming was popularised from the early days of eXtreme Programming or XP. The book Extreme Programming Explained written by Kent Beck describes pair… Read More »

Flow Efficiency

What percentage of your team’s time is actually spent working on the items that are ‘in progress’? 70%? 75%? 80%? Some suggest that it is as low as 2% and that 40% is the most that’s been observed. This is the world of flow efficiency. Originating from the manufacturing industry, flow efficiency measures the percentage… Read More »

Don’t forget to add in the conversation

Story, Epic or even Saga, what is the difference? David Lowe’s post from last year gives a good description of each. However, in my opinion, there is not much difference. A story, epic or saga all narrate the type of user, the need of the user, and the value returned by fulfilling that need. The… Read More »